Without going overboard then when formatted bullets 1 to 3 above will be most likely 8 to 10 pages. It might be more, but it should not be less.

Ideas for the structure of the Consolidated Portfolio There are many possible approaches, and it is the intention to test how well the students are at tackling the problem. In real life (as you probably know) a project manager is frequently confronted with the need to write a report and structuring the report for the audience is always a tricky thing to do. However, a way of tackling the consolidated portfolio is to do the following: –

1. Introduction and summary of outcomes 2. Itemise each learning outcome: –

a. LO1 i. Summary

ii. Evidence b. LO2

i. Summary ii. Evidence

c. … etc. 3. Discussion and Conclusion 4. References 5. Appendix of the weeks

a. Week 1 b. Week 2 c. … etc.

Without going overboard then when formatted bullets 1 to 3 above will be most likely 8 to 10 pages. It might be more, but it should not be less. Each LO would contain two to three paragraphs. The important thing is to say in the LO section how the student achieved the LO. This is done through the summary and the evidence that points to each week in the appendix. In the course profile students are encouraged to imagine they are going before an interview panel and had been asked to show them how they could meet the job criteria (learning outcomes). So, as a prerequisite they had to prepare a paper for them.

The marking criteria can often be encapsulated into a four stage criteria: –

1. Does the section or topic meet all of the basic learning requirements relevant of the course, such as knowledge of fundamental concepts and performance of basic skills; demonstrates sufficient quality of performance to be considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the learning outcomes of the assignment? (25%)

2. Does the section or topic reflect an ability to use and apply fundamental concepts and skills of the course, going beyond mere replication of content knowledge or skill to show understanding of key ideas, awareness of their relevance, some use of analytical skills, and some originality or insight? (50%)

3. Does the section or topic demonstrate awareness and understanding of deeper and less obvious aspects of the course, such as ability to identify and debate critical issues or problems, ability to solve non-routine problems, ability to adapt and apply ideas to new situations, and ability to invent and evaluate new ideas? (75%)

4. Has the section or topic been presented with imagination, originality or flair, based on proficiency in all the relevant learning outcomes of the course; work is interesting or surprisingly exciting, challenging, well read or scholarly? (100%)

This criterion is ADDITIVE. In other words, the last item (4) is inclusive of the previous ones (1, 2, and 3). If you feel that a student did most of 4 then you might give them 25% of the overall mark for the first criteria and then 25% of the overall mark for the second criteria and then 25% of the overall mark for the third criteria and finally 10% of the mark for the fourth criteria. So, the overall mark will be 85% overall. This means that the first gate the student must meet is (1) the basic learning requirements relevant of the course, such as knowledge of fundamental concepts and performance of basic skills; demonstrates sufficient quality of performance to be considered satisfactory or adequate or competent or capable in relation to the learning outcomes of the assignment. If they don’t meet that criteria then they can’t get a grade for the second criteria. You can use a similar concept when you think of many assignments. In other words, is the assignment (1) average, (2) good, (3) excellent, (4) amazingly superb? It makes it easier to think of things that way. The words in each of the criteria is just a rational and fancy way of expressing average, good, excellent, amazingly superb!

 

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