How do nursing students and nurse faculty members contribute to incivility in nursing education?

Clark and Springer (2007) conducted a qualitative study to examine the perceptions of faculty and students in a nursing program on incivility. Their key questions were:

 

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  • How do nursing students and nurse faculty members contribute to incivility in nursing education?
  • What are some of the causes of incivility in nursing education?
  • What remedies might be effective in preventing or reducing incivility?

 

They gathered responses from online surveys with open-ended questions from 36 nurse faculty and 168 nursing students. Each of the researchers reviewed all comments and organized them by themes. They noted four major themes of responses:

 

  • Faculty perceptions of in-class disruption and incivility by students
  • Faculty perceptions of out-of-class disruption and incivility by students
  • Student perceptions of uncivil behaviors by faculty
  • Faculty and student perceptions of possible causes of incivility in nursing education

 

A total of eight sub-themes were identified among the faculty comments on types of in-class disruptions. Those subthemes were:

 

  • Disrupting others by talking in class
  • Making negative remarks/disrespectful comments toward faculty
  • Leaving early or arriving late
  • Using cell phones
  • Sleeping/not paying attention
  • Bringing children to class
  • Wearing immodest attire
  • Coming to class unprepared
 

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